Tag Archive for 'testmasters'

Testmasters Makes the Inc. 500/5000 List of Fastest Growing US Companies

Testmasters makes the Inc 5000!

Testmasters makes the Inc 5000!

Thank you for being part of the It’s Not GREek community. We appreciate your readership and the opportunity to bring you free GRE resources, insights into the verbal and quantitative portions of the exam, graduate admissions tips, and more.

We are happy to announce that Testmasters, the company behind It’s Not GREek, has earned a spot on the Inc. 500/5000 List of the fastest growing US companies. We are proud of our success as a business the same way we are proud of the successes of our students.

We look forward to continuing to support you in securing the GRE score you need to go the places you want to go. We will continue to provide information we find useful and keep you in the loop on the opportunities Testmasters and It’s Not GREek continue to offer.

If there is anything we can do to help you in your journey to graduate school, please let us know. To view the press release go to this link

Thanks again,

The It’s Not GREek Team

GRE Testimonials

Check out what Test Masters students have been saying about the Test Masters GRE course:

“The teachers engage the students to not only improve their test scores, but to enjoy improving them. I walked away with techniques, a better score, and a memory of time well spent.”

Abbey N.

“Test Masters teaches you all you need to know for taking the GRE. The classes are not boring at all and the teachers are awesome!”

Kathryn D.

“Test Masters is the best test prep course ever! It will definitely improve your test scores to exceed your standards.”

Jennifer M.

“When you learn from the best, you can pass the test.”

Gregory M.

“TM is a very helpful course even for those who think they will not need help, I still recommend it. It’s really, really helpful and fun.”

Eliza M.

Test Masters not only gives students the knowledge and skill sets they need to succeed on the GRE, but does so in an energetic and engaging way!

Click here to learn more about GRE test preparation!

 

Sometimes it is Greek: Vicissitude

William Wordsworth famously defined poetry as “the spontaneous overflow of powerful emotions recollected in tranquility.”

In this post “It’s not GREek!” will discuss a new word likely to appear on the GRE.  We aim not only to give you a new word to memorize, but also to provide you with some background and etymological history to help you remember it.  At the end of the post, we will also give you a sentence with a few other new words to add to your flash cards.  By following this weekly series, you should be more prepared than ever to tackle the sentence completion, sentence equivalencies, and reading comprehension questions on test day.

This Week’s Word: Vicissitude

Life is full of vicissitudes, those unexpected challenges which arise during the course of a day. They are changes or unexpected deviations from normalcy. More often than not a vicissitude is associated with a hardship, but it may also refer to a beneficial happenstance; the chief characteristic of a vicissitude is that it is unintentional and simply a result of chance.

Vicissitude finds its etymological origins in the Latin word vicissitudo, which means “change.”

Vicissitude may also generally refer, not to specific troubles resulting from chance, but to the natural mutability that is characteristic of life and man. Coupled with its pleasant cadence and reference to unexpected hardships, this transcendental understanding of vicissitude makes it a favorite subject for writers and poets.

William Wordsworth’s publication Miscellaneous Sonnets includes a sonnet, titled “Surprised by Joy – impatient as the Wind,” with a quintuple introduction featuring an excellent reference to this week’s vocabulary word:

Surprised by joy — impatient as the Wind

I turned to share the transport — Oh! with whom

But Thee, deep buried in the silent tomb,

That spot which no vicissitude can find?

                                         Love, faithful love, recalled thee to my mind —

Sample Sentence:

Valiantly, Virginia vied to vanquish life’s vacuous vagaries and vicious vicissitudes.

Miss the last “Sometimes it is Greek?” Check it out here. Want more GRE vocabulary? Click here for the free Test Masters GRE vocabulary list with over 2,000 words!

 

Should I cancel my GRE scores?

Taking the GRE is a scary enough experience, but even after you have finished the exam, you will be left with one major decision: do you want to see your scores or cancel them?

No matter how badly you thought you did on the test, you never want to cancel your score. Continue reading “Should I cancel my GRE scores?” »

Sometimes it is Greek: Bilk

Johan Tetzel, a bilker from the Middle Ages, claimed he was selling indulgences to help build a new church but instead pocketed the money for himself.

Each week, “It’s not GREek!” will discuss a new word likely to appear on the GRE.  We aim not only to give you a new word to memorize, but also to provide you with some background and etymological history to help you remember it.  At the end of the post, we will also give you a sentence with a few other new words to add to your flash cards.  By following this weekly series, you should be more prepared than ever to tackle the sentence completion, sentence equivalencies, and reading comprehension questions on test day.

This Week’s Word:  Bilk Continue reading “Sometimes it is Greek: Bilk” »

“Should I Retake the GRE?”

Let’s say you took the old GRE a couple years ago, and are thinking about applying to graduate schools this fall.  Should you take the new GRE if you already took the old GRE?

All GRE scores, from the old and the new test, are valid for five years after you’ve taken the test, and the departments we contacted have indicated they will continue to accept old GRE scores as long as they are valid.  So, if you took the old GRE within the last five years, and are happy with your old score, there’s no reason to retake the test.  If you’re looking to score higher, though, you might want to consider retaking the exam. Continue reading ““Should I Retake the GRE?”” »

Sometimes it is Greek: New GRE Vocabulary


Starting next week, “It’s not GREek!” will be spotlighting a new vocabulary word–or words–that is likely to appear on the verbal section of the GRE.  We will not only give you a new word to study, but also give you some strategies for remembering the word so you can get a good score on the new GRE.  Before we get into that, though, let’s talk about some strategies for memorizing vocabulary.  Everyone has their own style, but this is what has worked best for me.

Continue reading “Sometimes it is Greek: New GRE Vocabulary” »

Should I Take the GRE or the GMAT?

GRE or GMAT, that is the question

For those of you who are unsure about whether you want to apply to graduate school or business school, you’re probably also thinking about whether you should be taking the GRE or the GMAT. Well here’s an article that discusses trends in business school admissions that may be of interest to you.


From the article, “The New GRE — GMAT Killer?“:
Since 2006, the ETS has been campaigning schools to accept the GRE as an alternative to the GMAT. According to a press release by the ETS, “About 450 MBA programs worldwide now accept the GRE test, including 45 percent of the U.S. News & World Report’s top 100 U.S. programs and seven of the top 10 global MBA programs according to The Financial Times.” These schools include some of the top-ranked business schools in the world, such as Harvard, Stanford, Wharton at UPenn, Stern at NYU, and Sloan at MIT.

Additionally, the revised GRE, coming in August of this year, is in part meant to make the exam more attractive to business schools. The ETS website states, “ETS has revised the test to better reflect the kind of thinking you’ll do in graduate or business school and improve your test-taking experience. New types of questions now more closely align with the skills you need to succeed in today’s demanding graduate and business school programs.” Removing analogies and antonyms, for instance, shifts the focus away from memorization and towards analysis and understanding.

It’s no surprise that more and more schools are starting to accept the GRE. The ETS estimates that there are approximately 700 GRE testing centers in 160 countries around the world; contrast this with a 2010 GMAC press release, which estimates that there are 500 testing centers in 110 countries.  Schools that decide to accept the GRE can expand their applicant pools by making it more convenient for international applicants applying to US business schools in this era of globalization. Additionally, the move to accept the GRE is beneficial to students as well. Those who are trying to decide between going to graduate school and going to business school don’t have to choose one over the other or worry about taking two tests (and paying two registration fees) — they can simply take the GRE and apply to both. Testmasters recommends that prospective students take both tests and submit the higher score.

TL;DR: You may be able to take one test and apply to both! Pretty sweet deal, if you ask me!